Parties who ask a court to compel arbitration of all the plaintiff’s claims have a decision to make: should they ask the court to stay the claims or dismiss them (if it finds them arbitrable)?   After noting that the federal courts of appeal are “about evenly divided” on that question, the Second Circuit held that

Arbitration has a brand recognition problem. Not enough people know what it is.

The recent CFPB report summarized studies showing that even among consumers who know they have an arbitration clause, the majority do not realize they cannot go to court or have their claims decided by a jury. One explanation is that those consumers

Because courts apply a presumption of arbitrability when they analyze whether particular claims fall within the scope of an arbitration clause, and arbitration clauses are generally drafted very broadly, I don’t usually get to write about courts finding that a dispute falls outside the scope of arbitrable claims.  But this week, both the Second and

California is the Judd Nelson of The Preemption Club.  (Or the John Bender, if you prefer using character names.)  The Supreme Court has sent the California courts to preemption detention for ignoring the Federal Arbitration Act in blockbuster, groundbreaking cases (see Concepcion).  But California cannot help itself.  It keeps coming up with novel arguments

The ABA Journal released its seventh annual list of the top 100 legal blogs in the country and ArbitrationNation is honored to be included for a second year in a row.  ArbitrationNation is the only blawg on the list devoted to arbitration.  (And it looks like one of only two from Minnesota authors…)

Now that

Take out your birthday hats and balloons — Arbitration Nation is celebrating its first full year of existence!  I have enjoyed reading all the developments in arbitration law over the past year and connecting with many people — through this blog, listservs, emails and Twitter– about their reactions to the case law. 

Here are some