I called it.  SCOTUS issued its unanimous opinion today in Henry Schein v. Archer & White, vacating and remanding the Fifth Circuit decision and making clear that there is no “wholly groundless” exception to the Federal Arbitration Act’s enforcement of delegation clauses.

As you may recall, a circuit split had developed over the “wholly groundless” exception.  Some circuits, including the Fifth, concluded that even when parties have delegated questions of arbitrability (questions like: is the arbitration agreement valid? and does it cover the current dispute?) to an arbitrator, courts have the right to do an initial smell test.  If the court finds the defendant’s argument for arbitrability is “wholly groundless” (and stinks), then it can refuse to send it to arbitrator.  Other circuits, however, found room for no such exception in SCOTUS’s decisions.

After quickly shooting down the four primary arguments proffered in favor of the exception, the Court concluded:

In sum, we reject the “wholly groundless” exception. The exception is inconsistent with the statutory text and with our precedent. It confuses the question of who decides arbitrability with the separate question of who prevails on arbitrability. When the parties’ contract delegates the arbitrability question to an arbitrator, the courts must respect the parties’ decision as embodied in the contract.

Given that this outcome was expected, is there anything interesting about this decision?   On first glance, there is at least one thing.  The Court’s emphasis in this decision is on the parties’ agreement: it reasons that “a court may not decide an arbitrability question that the parties have delegated to an arbitrator.”  That could be read as a signal that the Court also favors arbitrators determining the availability of class arbitration, in the circuit split on whether a delegation clause authorizes an arbitrator to decide that issue.

However, SCOTUS inserted a final paragraph that leaves it some wiggle room on that question.  It notes that “We express no view about whether the contract at issue in this case in fact delegated the arbitrability question to an arbitrator. The Court of Appeals did not decide that issue.”  In other words, if the Court is going to keep the decision regarding class arbitrability in courts, it will likely be because it finds that an incorporation of arbitral rules is not sufficient to “clearly and unmistakably” delegate arbitrability to an arbitrator.

 

As we close out 2018, it is a good time to reflect on the year in arbitration law.  Overall, I would characterize the year as another in which everyone was mildly obsessed with class actions, the U.S. Supreme Court again showed its willingness to enforce arbitration agreements of all kinds, and lower courts and groups of citizens attempted to resist the high court’s blind faith in arbitration with some success.  Here are my thoughts on the biggest stories of the year:

  • Decision With Biggest Impact: SCOTUS’s ruling in Epic Systems Groups of employees argued that the National Labor Relations Act gave them the right to join class actions and no arbitration agreement could overcome that statutory right.  But the Court emphatically rejected that argument, holding that employees are bound to the agreements they sign and nothing in the NLRA contradicts that result.  The outcome of this case was not unexpected, but the fallout was dramatic.  Many class actions dried up almost immediately, while others took a few months.  Yet other employees decided to give mass individual arbitration a go, filing hundreds of arbitration demands against the same employer simultaneously.
  • Circuit Split Most Likely To Go To SCOTUS: The split over who — judges or arbitrators — should decide whether the parties’ arbitration agreement allows class arbitration.   Seven federal circuits have looked at this issue.  Four have concluded that the issue of class arbitration is a big enough deal that it is presumptively for courts to decide, even when the parties have incorporated arbitration rules that authorize an arbitrator to decide jurisdictional questions.  Three circuits disagree.  Given the Supreme Court’s attraction to everything class arbitration, this seems likely to pique the Justices’ interest.  (Indeed, a cert petition has been filed in the 11th Circuit case, which is on the minority side of this circuit split, and the Justices have asked the winning party to respond.)
  • Best Evidence That Arbitration Law Is Still In Its Infancy: The conflicting cases over whether Uber’s arbitration agreement is enforceable.  Nothing says “This is a developing area of law” like having the First Circuit refuse to enforce the same arbitration agreement that the Second Circuit had just agreed to enforce.  Even better — the difference turned on the color of the hyperlink.  [Runner up in this category are the conflicting cases over whether the arbitration agreements printed on the outside of roofing shingle packages are enforceable.]
  • Most Successful Political Attack on Arbitration: The #MeToo movement successfully brought public attention to  concerns that having arbitration agreements in employment contracts may exacerbate a discriminatory workplace.  As a result, legislation declaring arbitration agreements invalid in cases of sexual assault or harassment was introduced at the federal level and many states.  To date, I am aware of it passing in only New York and Washington.  But, those state statutes are likely preempted by the Federal Arbitration Act.  More effective may be the public pronouncements by many major corporations that they will not enforce arbitration agreements in cases of sexual assault or harassment.
  • New Face of the Resistance: Kentucky.  First place had to go to Kentucky, after this decision, in which it just ignored the fact that the U.S. Supreme Court had schooled it on arbitration law last year.  But there are many runners-up in this category, frequently consisting of courts who are using the flexibility inherent in state contract law to find ways around arbitration.  For example, the courts who have recently decided that if the parties either did not choose an entity to administer the arbitration, or chose one that is no longer available, that voids the entire arbitration agreement. (See postscript on this entry.)  Or the courts who found that, despite the federal presumption in favor of arbitrability, the parties’ disagreement was outside the scope of their arbitration agreement.
  • Most Outrageous Motion To Compel: There are moments you just want to say “What were you thinking??” to counsel for the defense.  This year, this case stood out to me for outrageous conduct, as the plaintiffs did not originally have an arbitration agreement but apparently were duped into signing one a year into the class action litigation.  But, this case was a close second (where the defense argued that blind plaintiffs should be bound by the arbitration agreement, despite no evidence they were made aware of its existence).

Turning our sights forward, what can we expect in 2019?  Well, SCOTUS owes us three arbitration decisions (Henry Schein, Lamps Plus, and New Prime).  None of those are likely to have broad impact on arbitration law, as they each deal with fairly narrow issues.  So, big stories will likely come from elsewhere.  Maybe the new Democratic majority in the House will have more interest (and success) in passing federal arbitration legislation?   Maybe mass individual arbitration filings will change the cost-benefit-analysis of class action waivers for corporations?  I look forward to watching it unfold with all of you!  Happy New Year.

I would understand if not every state supreme court got the memo from last year’s SCOTUS decision on FAA preemption, Kindred, which reminded state courts that the FAA prevents state courts from imposing additional requirements on arbitration agreements that are not required for other types of contracts.  But Kentucky definitely got the memo.  The memo was addressed to Kentucky. Yet, last week the Supreme Court of Kentucky released a new decision that continues to convey hostility to arbitration and SCOTUS’s decisions interpreting the FAA.

The legal issue in Northern Ky. Area Development District v. Snyder, 2018 WL 4628143 (Ky. Sept. 27, 2018) is straightforward: Does the FAA preempt a Kentucky statute that prohibits employers from conditioning employment on an employee’s agreement to arbitrate claims.  The statute prohibits an employer from requiring an employee to “waive, arbitrate, or otherwise diminish any existing or future claim, right, or benefit to which the employee or person seeking employment would otherwise be entitled.”  In this case, the plaintiff was required to sign an arbitration agreement in order to work for the governmental entity.  When she sued over her termination, the employer moved to compel arbitration.

The trial court refused to compel arbitration.  Then the court of appeals affirmed, finding that the employer never had authority to enter into the arbitration in the first place (due to the statute), so the arbitration agreement did not technically exist.  (Too cute by half.  Plus, Justice Kagan specifically said that formation issues could also be preempted.)

The Kentucky Supreme Court affirmed.  It also concluded that the employer, a state agency, was covered by the anti-arbitration statute.  And therefore, when it conditioned employment on an agreement to arbitrate, in violation of the statute, its action was “ultra vires,” and the resulting arbitration agreement was void.  (See parenthetical above.)

The court went on to find the anti-arbitration statute at issue was not preempted by the FAA.  The decision states with an apparently straight face that the statute “does not actually attack, single out, or specifically discriminate against arbitration agreements” and did not “evidenc[e] hostility to arbitration”.  The statute “simply prevents [the employer] from conditioning employment” on the arbitration agreement. Furthermore, it notes that the statute does not just preclude arbitration agreements, but also any agreement that waives or limits an employee’s rights.

BUT HERE’S THE PROBLEM.  Kentucky’s reasoning only makes sense if we agree that arbitration is a limitation or a diminishment of the employee’s rights.  If, instead, you assume that arbitration is simply an alternative forum for resolving the employee’s full set of rights, the logic falls apart.  But, will SCOTUS really want to hear another Kentucky decision?  Kentucky is betting that it won’t.  Maybe this should not surprise anyone; Kentucky did not exactly bend to SCOTUS’s will when Kindred was remanded.  And btw, the nursing home is seeking certiorari from the remand decision, and SCOTUS just relisted it, meaning it still has a chance. (For good measure, Kentucky’s high court issued a decision compelling arbitration on the same day, overruling an objection that the arbitration clause was not fully mutual.  Grimes v. GHSW Enterprises, 2018 WL 4628160 (Ky. Sept. 27, 2018).)

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Speaking of SCOTUS, Monday it denied cert in at least four arbitration cases.  Two were companion cases (from Cal. and Neb.) that sought guidance on what types of challenges can invalidate a delegation clause.  (My blog post here, SCOTUSblog here and here.)  Another presented issues regarding binding non-signatories to arbitration through equitable estoppel. The fourth involved a question of whether an employer waived its right to arbitration (Cash Biz).  (My post here, filings here.)

And – this morning, SCOTUS hears arguments in New Prime, addressing the exemption in FAA Section One.

[Thanks to @PerryCooper for alerting me to a few of these cert denials.]

I am a true arbitration nerd.  But, when SCOTUS takes a THIRD arbitration case for its upcoming term, I wonder if the Justices are more obsessed with arbitration than I am.  (Reminder of the other two here.)  If they hear about the same total number of cases as this year (69), arbitration will make up more than 4% of their docket.  Now, 4% isn’t huge.  For reference, intellectual property cases made up less than 4% of cases filed in federal district courts last year, and there were three I.P. cases decided by SCOTUS (two on inter partes review and the WesternGeco case).  At least I.P. cases have a category in the annual judiciary report, though.  That’s more than arbitration can say.  And still, it has three cases before the Supremes.

Enough stats, what is this case?  It is Henry Schein Inc. v. Archer and White Sales Inc., in which SCOTUS is going to resolve the circuit split over the “wholly groundless” doctrine.  Given how the NLRB decision just came out, I don’t think I’m stepping too far out on a limb if I predict: “wholly groundless” will be grounded.  (Maybe even “grounded wholly?”  Seriously, there has got to be some good word play possible, but I am too tired from watching the World Cup to develop it.)  Put simply, that doctrine will not stand in the way of any future delegation clauses.

(Thanks to Mark Kantor for being the first to tell me certiorari was granted in this case.)

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Switching gears, there are three new decisions from state high courts on the arbitrability of claims against nursing homes.  Two enforce the arbitration clauses, and one decidedly does not.

Nebraska and Colorado issued the pro-arbitration decisions, in both cases reversing a trial court’s refusal to enforce arbitration agreements.  In Colorow Health Care, LLC v. Fischer, 2018 WL 2771051 (Colo. June 11, 2018), the district court denied the nursing home’s motion to compel arbitration because it was not in bold text, as required by a state statute.  Without any discussion of the FAA (which would have been a much easier ground for reversal), the Colorado Supreme Court found that the statute only requires substantial compliance, and the defendant had substantially complied (by including the right language, in a larger font size than required, just not in bold). In Heineman v. Evangelical Lutheran Good Samaritan Society, 300 Neb. 187 (June 8, 2018), the district court had found the arbitration agreement lacked mutuality, violated the state arbitration statute, and violated public policy (because of the CMS rule on arbitration).  On appeal, the Supreme Court of Nebraska found mutuality, found the FAA applied and preempted the state arbitration statute, and noted that the CMS rule had been enjoined.

A week later, though, Nebraska rejected arbitrability in a different case against a nursing home.  In Cullinane v. Beverly Enterprises-Nebraska, Inc., 300 Neb. 210 (June 15, 2018), the issue was whether the arbitration agreement signed by the deceased’s husband was enforceable.  He admitted he signed all the admission documents, but stated in an affidavit that he understood he had to agree to arbitrate for his wife to be admitted to the facility.  He also stated that he did not understood he was waiving his wife’s right to a jury trial, and would not have signed if he had known that and that arbitration was optional.  Applying the FAA and state contract law, the Nebraska Supreme Court found the district court was not “clearly wrong” when it found the husband was fraudulently induced to executing the arbitration agreement for his wife.  Critically, the facility had not introduced any affidavit contradicting the alleged statements made at the time of admission.

Lots of folks are writing about the long-term impact of SCOTUS’s recent decision in Epic Systems, but it is also important to note that there has been immediate, short-term impact.

For example, a lead plaintiff agreed to take her sex discrimination case against a law firm  to individual arbitration, abandoning her putative class action, after the Epic decision was released.  A federal judge is ready to dismiss a separate class action against Epic Systems (regarding overtime pay) as a result of the new decision.  And a class action against Chipotle may get sliced and diced up, with about 30% of employees being sent to individual arbitration, while 70% of the class can proceed in court (because they started working for the chain before it instituted the arbitration program). There must be dozens (hundreds?) of similar employment class actions around the country.

Speaking of the trickle down effects of SCOTUS’s arbitration cases, last year’s Kindred decision is certainly a relevant headwater for the Supreme Court of West Virginia’s recent opinion upholding the arbitration agreement in nursing home admission documents.  Although West Virginia used to be reliably anti-arbitration, its recent decisions are pro-arbitration.  So, it’s not too surprising that in AMFM LLC v. Shanklin, 2018 WL 2467770 (W. Va. May 30, 2018), that court reversed a trial court’s ruling that the arbitration agreement signed by the resident’s daughter was not enforceable.  Careful not to interpret its statutes and common law regarding power of attorney in a way that stands as an obstacle to the FAA, West Virginia’s high court found that the daughter’s role as understudy in the POA document (fine, it says “successor” or “alternate”) was sufficient to bind her mother to the arbitration agreement.  The position drew a spirited dissent from one lone justice.

 

SCOTUS finally delivered its decision today in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis, the consolidated case that addresses whether employers can require employees to give up their right to class or consolidated litigation as part of an arbitration agreement.  In a 5-4 decision authored by Justice Gorsuch, the Court found that class action waivers are enforceable under the FAA, and nothing in the labor laws preclude that conclusion.

As usual, how the Court frames the question gives away its answer.  Justice Gorsuch began the majority opinion by asking: “Should employees and employers be allowed to agree that any disputes between them will be resolved through one-on-one arbitration?”* In contrast, Justice Ginsburg’s dissent frames the issue as “Does the [FAA] permit employers to insist that their employees, whenever seeking redress for commonly experienced wage loss, go it alone, never mind the right secured to employees by the National Labor Relations Act . . . ‘to engage in . . . concerted activities’ for their ‘mutual aid or protection'”?

The majority opinion started by painting the NLRB’s opposition to class action waivers as a sudden shift after 77 years of peaceful coexistence with the FAA.  It then finds that the NLRA cannot be applied via the savings clause of Section 2 of the FAA because it interferes with one of arbitration’s fundamental attributes — individual resolution — and therefore is not the type of defense that applies to any contract. (It cites Concepcion for the proposition that individual resolution is fundamental to arbitration.)

After finding nothing in the FAA itself that would prevent enforcement of the class action waivers at issue, the majority opinion looks to see if the NLRA clearly and manifestly indicates that Congress intended to override the FAA.  It finds no statutory or contextual evidence of that clear intent.  It also made short work of the employees’ argument for Chevron deference to the NLRB.  [One of the best lines from the opinion is in that section.  Noting that Chevron was based, in part, on the idea that policy choices should be left to the executive branch which voters can hold accountable, the majority writes: “whatever argument might be mustered for deferring to the Executive on grounds of political accountability, surely it becomes a garble when the Executive speaks from both sides of its mouth, articulating no single position on which it might be held accountable.”]

Interestingly, the majority decision acknowledges that there is a vigorous policy debate over the merits of class action waivers in arbitration.  At multiple points during the opinion Justice Gorsuch bows to the possibility that the FAA could be flawed: “You might wonder if the balance Congress struck in 1925 between arbitration and litigation should be revisited in light of more contemporary developments.”  And later “This Court is not free to substitute its preferred economic policies for those chosen by the people’s representatives.”  But each time he returns to the idea that the Court is bound by the law to rigidly enforce arbitration agreements.  In her dissent, Justice Ginsburg agrees that Congress is now the right branch of government to act.  The dissent states: “Congressional correction of the Court’s elevation of the FAA over workers’ rights to act in concert is urgently in order.”

The dissent would hold that Section 7 of the NLRA does guarantee the right to pursue collective litigation and trumps the FAA.  The dissent reviews the text and legislative history of the NLRA to support its conclusion and addresses the majority’s arguments.  What I found most interesting in the dissent, however, was its review of the legislative history behind Section 1 of the FAA.  Apparently, organized labor was concerned about the FAA’s impact, and Herbert Hoover amended the legislation to specifically exclude workers’ contracts.  Congress passed the amended version and labor withdrew its opposition.  [Justice Ginsburg’s research on that topic may come in handy next term when the Court addresses the New Prime case.]

This is the result that everyone expected based on oral argument and the current politics of the court.  But still, when I read the “Justice Gorsuch delivered the opinion of the Court,” I can’t help feeling like it should say “Justice Gorsuch delivered on President Trump’s promises of a conservative court.”  Would it have been better to just let the new appointments to the NLRB reverse the Board’s course of action, much like the reversals of other agencies, and save the Court from this particular insertion into politics?

*  (Do you hear that growly “one on one” from this song when you read that?   Maybe it’s just me.)

 

Today the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari in another case involving the Federal Arbitration Act.  The case, Lamps Plus, Inc. v. Varela, comes from the Ninth Circuit and raises a variation of the question from Sutter: how clear does an arbitration agreement need to be to show the parties authorized class arbitration?

My initial summary of the Ninth Circuit opinion is here.  It didn’t even merit an entire post of its own, but shared time with another circuit court opinion.  In my view, the issue of class arbitration has largely been hammered out.  SCOTUS ruled in Stolt-Nielsen that class arbitration is only allowed if the parties’ arbitration agreement authorizes it.  More recently, courts have generally concluded that courts, not arbitrators, should decide whether the parties’ arbitration agreement allows for class arbitration.  Finally, state law governs the question of how to interpret whether the parties’ arbitration agreement authorizes class arbitration.  Yet, now we will have a new decision on whether an interpretation of state law (interpreting ambiguity against a drafter to find class arbitration is authorized) should be preempted by the federal policy favoring arbitration (and particularly, favoring non-class arbitration).

In fact, the other two arbitration cases on SCOTUS’s docket also relate to class actions.  The NLRB case (whether forcing employees to waive their right to class actions in arbitration agreements is a violation of labor statutes) is still under consideration (it was argued last October).  And another upcoming case, New Prime, Inc. v. Oliveira, stems from a putative class action brought by independent contractors, even though the narrow issue before SCOTUS is whether an arbitrator or court should determine the applicability of the FAA.

If any Supreme Court clerk or justice had called me and asked “what are some of the really hot arbitration questions that this Court should resolve in order to ensure consistent decision-making around the country?,” class arbitration would not have been on my list.  I read every arbitration opinion that issues from the federal circuit courts and state high courts, and the issues I see courts struggling with most often include delegation clauses and issues relating to non-signatories.  Maybe I am not giving enough credit to the few class action opinions that come out (despite the fact that they impact many people), or alternatively maybe the Court’s emphasis on class arbitration highlights a political aspect of the cert process, or a particular interest of a majority of justices, or just the persuasiveness of this team.

 

Remember when Maria sang “Let’s start at the very beginning, it’s a very good place to start”?  Well, that seems to be what federal circuit courts are doing with their arbitration decisions recently.  This post will run through some Do Re Mis of arbitration law, as articulated by those decisions (and will close with some arbitration cases on SCOTUS’s docket).

  • In most circuits, arbitrators cannot subpoena documents in advance of an in-person hearing.  The 9th Circuit affirmed that applies within its jurisdiction as well.  CVS Health Corp. v. Vividus, __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 6519942 (9th Cir. Dec. 21, 2017).
  • When an arbitration agreement calls for application of arbitral rules, and those rules give the arbitrator power to rule on her own jurisdiction, then the district court should send any dispute over arbitrability to the arbitrator.  The 4th Circuit confirmed that holding applies to JAMS rules, just as it does to AAA rules.  Simply Wireless, Inc. v. T-Mobile US, Inc., __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 6374105 (4th Cir. Dec. 13, 2017).
  • Claims under the Fair Labor Standards Act are subject to arbitrationRodriguez-Depena v. Parts Authority, Inc., __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 6327827 (2d Cir. Dec. 12, 2017).  (The Second Circuit is at least the third federal circuit to reach that conclusion.)
  • An arbitration agreement that carves out injunctive relief means what it saysArcher & White Sales v. Henry Schein, Inc., __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 6523680 (Dec. 21, 2017).  The arbitration agreement called for arbitration of any dispute under the agreement “except for actions seeking injunctive relief and disputes related to [intellectual property].”  Plaintiff brought an antitrust action seeking damages and injunctive relief. Applying the exception, the district court denied the motion to compel arbitration and the appellate court affirmed.
  • Independent contractors are not “agents” that can be bound as a non-signatory to arbitration clauseOudani v. TF Final Mile, LLC, __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 5587648 (1st Cir. Nov. 21, 2017) (refusing to compel arbitration of class action brought by independent contractors for wage-and-hour claims).
  • Ambiguous awards can be sent back to the arbitrator.  Herll v. Auto-Owners Ins. Co., __ F.3d __, 2018 WL 296870 (8th Cir. Jan. 5, 2018)  (sending ambiguous “appraisal award” back to arbitrator under Minnesota’s Revised Uniform Arbitration Act.)
  • If the losing party failed to raise an argument in arbitration, it can’t use that argument to vacate the arbitration awardLaborers’ Pension Fund v. W.R. Weis Co., __ F.3d __, 2018 WL 316555 (7th Cir. Jan. 8, 2018) (finding in an ERISA dispute that one party “waived its statutory-interpretation argument by failing to raise it in the arbitration.”)
  • First Amendment arguments will not get a putative class out of arbitration with a private party.  Okay, this is not an arbitration law “basic” point, but instead one that confirms the ingenuity of plaintiffs’ class action lawyers. These plaintiffs opposed arbitration “on First Amendment grounds” and asserted there was state action because the FAA and judicial interpretations of it encourage arbitration to the point that AT&T’s actions are attributable to the state.  Roberts v. AT&T Mobility, __ F.3d __, 2017 WL 6275537 (9th Cir. Dec. 11, 2017).  The 9th Circuit found no state action, and noted that plaintiffs’ arguments that the FAA violates consumers’ constitutional rights are incompatible with the Supreme Court’s decisions on arbitration.

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Now that we’ve run through those reminders on issues that arise frequently in arbitration law, let’s talk about some unsettled issues.  SCOTUS today is considering two cases involving delegation clauses and how lower courts should put its Rent-a-Center, West decision into practice:

  • New Prime, Inc. v. Oliveira — this case comes from the First Circuit and raises the question whether the court should determine that the FAA applies before enforcing a delegation clause.  Why does that matter?   In this case a worker successfully argued the FAA did not govern, because he was an exempt transportation worker, and therefore the court refused to compel arbitration.  [Jan. 22 update: SCOTUS’s order list today does not include this as a grant or deny, so it will likely be considered again in February.]
  • Applied Underwriters Captive Risk Assurance Co. v. Minnieland Private Day School — this case comes from the Fourth Circuit and raises this question: Can a defense to arbitration that applies to the arbitration agreement as a whole ever be specific to the delegation clause?   [Disclosure: I was involved with this petition.] [ Jan. 22 update: SCOTUS denied cert.]

SCOTUS is also being asked to review a decision of the California Court of Appeal that refused to compel arbitration based on a state statute.  That California statute gives courts the discretion to deny enforcement of an arbitration provision when there is a possibility of conflicting rulings in pending litigation with third parties.  The cert petition asks whether the FAA preempts that California statute and will be considered in February.

Last month, SCOTUS  denied cert in another California arbitration case.  That petition, Betancourt v. Prudential Overall Supply, challenged California’s rule that private attorney general disputes cannot be arbitrated.  (SCOTUS passed on the same issue in 2015.)

Here’s hoping that in 2018 SCOTUS sticks with its recent practice of deciding at least one arbitration case per year!  And, here’s hoping the Vikings get in the Super Bowl!

If I had to choose a favorite subset of arbitration cases, it might be the ones that come after SCOTUS remands to a state supreme court.  How does a state high court full of accomplished professionals, the cream of the legal crop in their state, respond after the U.S. Supreme Court has found their previous arbitration opinion was flawed?  Often, they find a way to stick to their guns.  We already saw that once in 2017, when Hawaii affirmed its arbitration decision, despite the GVR from SCOTUS.  And now Kentucky has followed suit.

In Kindred Nursing Centers Ltd P’ship v. Wellner, 2017 WL 5031530 (Ky. Nov. 2, 2017), the Kentucky Supreme Court addressed what was left of its Extendicare decision after SCOTUS took it apart in May of this year.  But not much was left.  The original decision had consolidated three separate actions: one was not appealed to SCOTUS, one was reversed by SCOTUS, and only the third was remanded by SCOTUS.  In the remanded matter, the Kentucky Supreme Court had rested its decision on two alternative grounds–the ground that SCOTUS found was preempted (that a power of attorney must clearly grant the right to give up a court or jury trial in order to have a valid arbitration agreement executed by the agent), and a finding that the language of the power of attorney at issue was not broad enough to encompass entering into a pre-dispute arbitration agreement.  So, the job on remand was to determine whether the second ground could stand up on its own, or whether it was “impermissibl[y] taint[ed]” by the preempted ground.

A majority of the Kentucky Supreme Court found there was no taint.  The nursing home relied on two provisions in the power of attorney, one giving power to demand or collect money and institute legal proceedings, and another giving the power to make contracts “in relation to both real and personal property.”  The court found that the arbitration agreement “was not the enforcement…of something then due or to become due” “nor was it the making of a contract…pertaining to” property.  As a result, “that aspect of the Extendicare decision remains undisturbed.”

While four members signed the majority opinion, three members of the court dissented, complaining that the majority failed to follow SCOTUS’s directive.  The dissent wrote “this Court’s distinction between pre-dispute arbitration agreements as not pertaining to a principal’s property rights . . . is simply another attempt to single out arbitration for ‘hostile’ treatment under the guise of Kentucky contract and agency law.”

Indeed, the majority had not completed edited out its hostility to SCOTUS’s arbitration case law from the decision.  For example, it criticized the Supreme Court’s

perception that our application of the clear statement rule, rather than the manifestation of our profound respect for the right of access to the Court of Justice explicitly guaranteed by the Kentucky Constitution and the right to trial by jury designated as “sacred” by Section 7 of the Kentucky Constitution, demonstrated instead a hostility to federal policies implicit in the Federal Arbitration Act and a resulting aversion to any implication of authority to make an arbitration agreement.

Pro tip to Kentucky: edit out any future references to jury trials being sacred if you want to avoid another certiorari petition in an arbitration case.

 

 

This is my 290th post at ArbitrationNation and today I celebrate six years of blogging.  Woo hoo — that’s longer than most celebrity marriages!  In honor of the occasion, here are updates on six of the hottest issues in arbitration law so far this year.

  1. Agency regulation of arbitration agreements.  On the one hand, the CFPB issued a rule that will preclude financial institutions from using class action waivers in arbitration agreements.  To understand how “yuge” this is, remember that the CFPB’s initial study showed there are likely over 100 million arbitration agreements impacted by this rule.  (And there does not seem to be the necessary political willpower to stop it.)  On the other hand, agencies headed by Trump appointees have moved to roll back Obama-era consumer-friendly regulations of arbitration agreements in nursing homes and educational institutions.
  2. NLRB.  While the CFPB attacks class action waivers in the financial industry, the NLRB has been attacking those waivers in the employment context, taking the position that such waivers violate the National Labor Relations Act.  A circuit split developed, with the 6th, 7th, and 9th circuits on NLRB’s side, and the 2nd, 5th and 8th circuits siding with the employers.  The Supreme Court will hear arguments on October 2.
  3. Wholly Groundless.  When considering whether to enforce delegation clauses, some federal court have developed a carve-out for claims they think are nothing but hot air.  [Remember delegation clauses are those portions of arbitration agreements that authorize arbitrators to determine even arbitrability — whether the arbitration agreement is valid and encompasses the claims — issues usually decided by courts.]  That carve-out has been called the “wholly groundless” exception, and it is coming up with greater frequency.  Currently there is a circuit split: the 5th, 6th and federal circuits are in favor of spot-checking claims of arbitrability (e.g. Evans v. Building Materials Corp. of Am., 2017 WL 2407857 (Fed. Cir. June 5, 2017)), while the 10th and 11th Circuits believe SCOTUS’s precedent leaves no room for conducting a smell test (e.g. Jones v. Waffle House, Inc., 2017 WL 3381100 (11th Cir. Aug. 7, 2017)).
  4. Formation.  SCOTUS decided the Kindred case in May, confirming that state law on contract formation is also subject to preemption by the Federal Arbitration Act.  That was timely, given that plaintiffs appear to be placing their bets on challenging formation as the most effective way around an arbitration agreement.  They might be right.  See James v. Global Tellink Corp., 852 F.3d 262 (3d Cir. Mar. 29, 2017); Noble v. Samsung Electronics America, Inc., 2017 WL 838269 (3d Cir. March 3, 2017); King v. Bryant, 795 S.E.2d 340 (N.C. Jan. 27, 2017).
  5. Small Claims Court.  If a company starts a small claims court action to collect a debt, does that waive the company’s right to compel arbitration years later in response to a suit by the consumer?  This is a question multiple courts are facing, with differing results.  E.g., Cain v. Midland Funding, LLC, 156 A.3d 807 (Md. Mar. 24, 2017) (waiver); Hudson v. Citibank, 387 P.3d 42 (Alaska Dec. 16, 2016) (no waiver); Citibank, N.A. v. Perry, 797 S.E.2d 803 (W. Va. Nov. 10, 2016) (no waiver).  It is important because many consumer arbitration agreements exempt small claims from arbitrable claims, but may reconsider if that is considered a waiver of everything else.
  6. Statutory Preclusion.  The Federal Arbitration Act generally requires courts to enforce arbitration agreements.  But, if there is a contrary congressional command entitling the litigant to a court trial, it can override the FAA.  That issue has already come up multiple times this year, with the FAA generally winning its battles with other statutes.  E.g., McLeod v. General Mills, Inc., 854 F.3d 420 (8th Cir. Apr. 14, 2017).

Thanks to all of you for providing great feedback, leads on cases and topics, client referrals, and a warm community of fellow arbitration geeks.  I look forward to another year of blogging.